Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, North American Mammals
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  Carnivora · Ursidae · Ursus arctos
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Ursus arctos

Brown Bear, Grizzly Bear

Order: Carnivora
Family: Ursidae

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Conservation Status: Least Concern.


Brown Bears are solitary, powerful predators who can be aggressive to one another. There is a social hierarchy: adult males are dominant, and females with cubs are dominant over juvenile males and females without cubs. Brown Bears are omnivorous, consuming everything from mosses, fungi, herbs, grasses, fruits, berries, small vertebrates, insects, birds, and fishespecially salmon during their spawning runto other mammals. They dig after burrowing mammals and take down large hoofed mammals caught in deep snow or otherwise disabled. They are excellent swimmers and have acute senses of hearing and smell, but poor eyesight, and can attack humans without warning. The largest North American males weigh more than 600 kg (1,325 pounds).

Also known as:
Bears from the interior of Alaska and Canada usually have pale-tipped guard hairs, and are called Grizzly Bears.

Sexual Dimorphism:
Males are 8%-10% larger than females.

Length:
Average: 1.28 m

Weight:
Average: 389 kg males; 207 kg females
Range: 80->600 kg

References:

Linnaeus, C., 1758.  Systema Naturae per regna tria naturae, secundum classis, ordines, genera, species cum characteribus, differentiis, synonymis, locis. Tenth Edition, Laurentii Salvii, Stockholm, 1:47, 824 pp.

Links:

Mammal Species of the World

Mammalian Species, American Society of Mammalogists' species account

Distribution of Ursus arctos

Image of Ursus arctos
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Image of Ursus arctos
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