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Nasua narica

White-nosed Coati

Order: Carnivora
Family: Procyonidae

Image of Nasua narica
Nasua narica - male, upper left; females and young, lower right
Click to enlarge. (90 kb)

Conservation Status: Least Concern.


White-nosed Coatis are the most diurnal members of the family Procyonidae. They often sleep curled up in trees, and come down at dawn to forage, rooting with their long, mobile snouts and digging with long, curved claws for insects, larvae, eggs, and small vertebrates. Adult males often live alone, but females and young coatis travel together in bands, vocalizing and grooming each other. They do not hunt cooperatively or share food, but they join forces to defend against male coatis and other intruders. Females raise their young alone, in a nest. Mortality can be high when the young first leave the nest, from predators—including male coatis, big cats, monkeys, and boa constrictors—and accidents and disease.

Also known as:
Coatimundi, Gato Solo, Pizote

Sexual Dimorphism:
Males are larger than females.

Length:
Range: 750-1,350 mm

Weight:
Range: 2.5-5.5 kg

References:

Linnaeus, C., 1766.  Systema Naturae per regna tria naturae, secundum classis, ordines, genera, species cum characteribus, differentiis, synonymis, locis, Regnum Animale. Twelfth edition, Laurentii Salvii, Holmiae, 1:64, 824 pp.

Links:

Mammal Species of the World

Mammalian Species, American Society of Mammalogists' species account

Distribution of Nasua narica

Image of Nasua narica
Click to enlarge. (182kb)