Skip to main content.

Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History
{search_item}
Fairchild Jade, 2005

A scene from the Carnival festival of the Huastecan Nahuas. February 1993. Huautla, Hidalgo, Mexico.

A scene from the Carnival festival of the Huastecan Nahuas. February 1993. Huautla, Hidalgo, Mexico. Photo courtesy of George O. Jackson de Llano.

Organized by the Mexico-North Research Network, Mexican Cycles celebrates Mexico’s cultural diversity and the creativity of the members of its Indigenous communities by exploring the annual cycle of their religious festivals as captured in the images of the Mexican-American photographer George O. Jackson de Llano. Based in Austin, Texas, Jackson de Llano is widely regarded as among the most accomplished photographers of Mexican ceremonial life today. Between 1990 and 2001, he photographed the religious festivals of Indigenous communities from across Mexico. The result is an unparalleled record of these festivals at the turn of the 21st century and of the complex interaction of Indigenous and European religious traditions out of which they emerged.

The National Museum of Natural History received federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center, to install this exhibition.

 

Public Programs

Lecture

A Journey through Mexico with George O. Jackson de Llano
Saturday, September 29, 2007, 2:30 PM
Baird Auditorium, National Museum of Natural History
10th Street and Constitution Avenue, NW. Washington, D.C.

In an illustrated lecture Jackson de Llano provides personal insights into his acclaimed photographic work featured in the Mexican Cycles exhibit.

Free and Open to the public.

Festival

MexicoFest
Saturday, October 13, 2007, 11-4 PM
National Museum of Natural History, 2nd Floor
10th Street and Constitution Avenue, NW. Washington, D.C.

Enjoy a day of craft-making and dance performances that highlight the rich artistic and cultural traditions of Mexico. Also included are talks by museum scientists on their research activities in Mexico.

Free and open to the public.

[ TOP ]