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Bogoslof

Bogoslof

Lava dome remnants from three historical eruptions can be seen in this NW-looking aerial view of Bogoslof Island in the Aleutians. The pinnacle on the left is Castle Rock, also referred to as Old Bogoslof, a remnant of a 1796 lava dome. The circular, flat-topped area to its right is a remnant of a 1927 lava dome. The most recent eruption of Bososlof, in 1992, produced the light-colored conical lava dome forming the tip of the island at upper right. Frequent eruptions and vigorous wave erosion have greatly modified the island in historical time.

Bogoslof

Bogoslof

An aerial view shows the 1992 lava dome of Bogoslof Island, the summit of a largely submarine stratovolcano located in the Bering Sea 50 km behind the main Aleutian arc. The 1992 lava dome grew to a height of 100 m in July at the northern tip of Bogoslof Island. The island is about 1.5 x 0.6 km wide, and due to its frequent eruptive activity and energetic wave action, has changed shape dramatically since first mapped in the late 1700's.


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