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Bezymianny

Bezymianny

The Novy lava dome at Kamchatka's Bezymianny volcano has been growing since 1956 within a large horseshoe-shaped crater. The 1.8 x 2.5 km crater formed during the catastrophic 1956 eruption when the summit of the volcano collapsed, producing a debris avalanche and lateral blast that swept to the east. This 1980's view from the SW shows the outer flanks of the pre-1956 volcano in the foreground. The lava dome has subsequently grown to the height of the crater rim.

Bezymianny

Bezymianny

A black lava flow descends from the snow-mantled summit lava dome of Bezymianny volcano in Kamchatka in September 1990. The lava dome has formed during the past forty years both by expansion when new magma is intruded into the dome and by the extrusion of lava flows down its flanks. The dome has grown within a large crater, whose southern rim is visible behind the lava flow.

Bezymianny

Bezymianny

The small hills in this photo were produced during a 1956 eruption of Bezymianny volcano that closely resembled the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. The hummocky terrain is reminiscent of the debris-avalanche deposit filling the Toutle River at Mount St. Helens, and likewise was produced by a massive volcanic landslide when Bezymianny collapsed on March 30, 1956. The hummocks consist of material formerly composing the Bezymianny edifice that swept up to 18 km to the east in a highly mobile debris avalanche.


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