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Aso

Aso

Kometsuka scoria cone, on the NW side of the central cone complex of Aso volcano on the island of Kyushu, was constructed about 1800 years ago. Explosive eruptions building the cinder cone were accompanied by lava flows that traveled down the flank of this complex of stratovolcanoes in the center of Aso caldera. A broad moat separates the central cone complex from the caldera walls, which form the horizon.

Bachelor

Bachelor

Kwohl Butte cinder cone is one in a 25-km-long chain of cinder cones and small shield volcanoes south of Mount Bachelor in the central Cascade Range of Oregon. Despite the youthful appearance of the cone, geologic mapping indicates construction of the chain was completed about 12,000 years ago

Barren Island

Barren Island

The 1991 eruption dramatically modified the morphology of the central cinder cone on the small Barren Island, one of the Andaman Islands, north of Sumatra. During the eruption the height of the cinder cone was lowered from 305 m to 225 m, and the diameter of its crater increased from 60 m to about 200 m. Two small cinder cones also formed in the lava field west of the main cone.

Crater Lake

Crater Lake

Wizard Island cinder cone, with a symmetrical 90-m-wide crater at its summit, formed above the west floor of Oregon's Crater Lake caldera within a few hundred years of caldera formation. A lava flow created the peninsula in the foreground on the NW side of the cone, which forms a small island on the west side of Crater Lake. A submerged dome, 30 m beneath the surface 1 km east of Wizard Island, is the youngest feature of Crater Lake caldera.

Kaikohe-Bay of Islands

Kaikohe-Bay of Islands

This basaltic scoria cone is one of 30 Pleistocene to upper-Holocene eruptive centers in the Kaikohe-Bay of Islands volcanic field near the tip of the Northland Peninsula in NW-most North Island, New Zealand. The most recent eruptions produced scoria cones and lava flows near Te Puke about 1300-1800 years ago. The volcanic field also contains small shield volcanoes, along with minor rhyolitic lava flows and domes.

Negro, Cerro

Negro, Cerro

Cerro Negro cinder cone in Nicaragua, Central America's youngest volcano, was born in April 1850. It has been one of Nicaragua's most active volcanoes, building up a roughly 250-m-high cinder cone surrounded by a field of fresh lava flows. Cerro Negro is seen here in 1981 from Cerro la Mula on the north, the next in a chain of four cinder cones erupted along a N-S line.

Newberry Volcano

Newberry Volcano

Some the more than 400 cinder cones that dot the flanks of the massive 30 x 60 km wide Newberry shield volcano in Oregon are seen in this view from Paulina Peak on the south rim of Newberry caldera. The cinder cones at Newberry are most abundant on the north and south flanks. Many are of Pleistocene age, but cinder cones along a rift on the NW flank and some on the south flank have erupted during the Holocene.

Okmok

Okmok

Steam rises in December 1980 from a cinder cone in Alaska's Okmok caldera. Known only as Cone A, it is one of numerous unnamed pyroclastic cones within the 10-km-wide caldera. Erosional furrows produce linear stripes on the flank of the cone. Eruptions from Cone A in 1945 and 1958 produced lava flows, which issued onto the caldera floor. Cone A erupted again six months after the date of this photo. The wall of Okmok caldera forms the skyline ridge.

San Quintin Volc Field

San Quintin Volc Field

The Volcan Sudoeste cinder cone and smaller cones at its base are part of the San Quintin volcanic field in Mexico's Baja Peninsula. They are seen here from the north on the slopes of Picacho Vizcaino. Volcán Sudoeste is one of the youngest scoria cones of the San Quintin volcanic field. It lies on a narrow peninsula between the Falsa bay (left) and the Pacific Ocean (right).

Tolbachik

Tolbachik

Powerful jets of incandescent lava rise above the crater of a cinder cone along Kamchatka's Tolbachik south-flank rift zone in late-July 1975. This cinder cone, the first of three large cones formed along the northern part of the rift zone during the early stage of the eruption, began to grow on July 6. At times, powerful lava fountains rose 1-2.5 km above the vent and ash columns reached 10-18 km heights. After July 27, eruptions from the first cone became dominantly effusive. Activity at the first cone ceased on August 9.

Washington

Washington

The contrasting morphology of rounded Hayrick Butte on the left and flat-topped Hoodoo Butte on the right, north of Mount Washington in the central Oregon Cascades, reflects dramatic differences in their origin. Hoodoo Butte is a tuya, a volcanic cone formed by eruptions that ponded in a cavity melted through a glacial icesheet. Hayrick Butte formed slightly later, when the Pleistocene icesheet had melted, and formed the classic rounded profile of a cinder cone.


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