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Azurite

Azurite

The name azurite is taken from the characteristic azure-blue color of the mineral. It is an ore of copper and a minor ornamental stone. Azurite commonly occurs with the minerals malachite, limonite, and chalcopyrite. Crystals are usually well-formed equidimensional or tabular, but can also occur as radiating, botryoidal, or incrusting crystals. This specimen is from the Copper Queen Mine in Bisbee, AZ.

Azurite

Azurite

The name azurite is taken from the characteristic azure-blue color of the mineral. It is an ore of copper and a minor ornamental stone. Azurite commonly occurs with the minerals malachite, limonite, and chalcopyrite. Crystals are usually well-formed equidimensional or tabular, but can also occur as radiating, botryoidal, or incrusting crystals. This specimen is from the Copper Queen Mine in Bisbee, AZ.

Azurite

Azurite

Bisbee, Arizona is famous for the diversity and magnificance of the minerals mined there. Over two hundred minerals have been found there. Most prominent among the Bisbee minerals are azurite, malachite, and other copper minerals. This specimen of azurite came from the famous Copper Queen Mine in Bisbee.

Azurite

Azurite

Bisbee, Arizona is famous for the diversity and magnificance of the minerals mined there. Over two hundred minerals have been found there. Most prominent among the Bisbee minerals are azurite, malachite, and other copper minerals. This specimen of azurite came from the famous Copper Queen mine in Bisbee.

Azurite

Azurite

Bisbee, Arizona is famous for the diversity and magnificance of the minerals mined there. Over two hundred minerals have been found there. Most prominent among the Bisbee minerals are azurite, malachite, and other copper minerals. This specimen of azurite came from the famous Copper Queen mine in Bisbee. The chemical composition of azurite is Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2.

Azurite altering to malachite

Azurite altering to malachite

This photo shows a very large single crystal of azurite (intense azure blue) just starting to alter to malachite (green) on its surface. If the new mineral retains the crystal shape of the original, the specimen is called a pseudomorph - meaning "false form." The original crystal of azurite is unstable in open air and most likely reacted with carbon dioxide or water in the air to alter to green malachite.

Azurite with Malachite

Azurite with Malachite

Bisbee, Arizona is famous for the diversity and magnificance of the minerals mined there. Over two hundred minerals have been found there. Most prominent among the Bisbee minerals are azurite, malachite, and other copper minerals. This group of large (3.5cm high) azurite crystals came from the famous Copper Queen mine in Bisbee.


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