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Pyrite

Pyrite

Pyrite

Pyrite

Different growth conditions result in different external shapes of pyrite. This is despite the fact that they are all made up of iron and sulfur atoms linked in the same cubic pattern. The three common shapes of pyrite are: pyritohedron, octahedron, and cube. Cubes tend to grow under low temperatures from solutions with low concentrations of iron and sulfur. Octahedrons and pyritohedrons grow under higher temperatures and more concentrated solutions.

Pyrite

Pyrite

Different growth conditions result in different external shapes of pyrite. This is despite the fact that they are all made up of iron and sulfur atoms linked in the same cubic pattern. The three common shapes of pyrite are: pyritohedron, octahedron, and cube. Cubes tend to grow under low temperatures from solutions with low concentrations of iron and sulfur. Octahedrons and pyritohedrons grow under higher temperatures and more concentrated solutions.

Pyrite (Pyritohedron)

Pyrite (Pyritohedron)

Pyrite (with Quartz)

Pyrite (with Quartz)

Pyrite cubes

Pyrite cubes

These pyrite crystals formed exactly as you see them. Their cubic shape mirrors the internal cubic arrangement of iron and sulfur atoms. Because of its color and luster, pyrite is also known as fool's gold.

Pyrite inclusions in quartz

Pyrite inclusions in quartz

An inclusion is a foreign matter contained in a host mineral. In this specimen, we can see pyrite inclusions seemingly floating in this clear quartz crystal. Inclusions strictly conform with natural law, and are never accidental. The crystals of pyrite in the quartz specimens below originally formed on the surfaces of quartz crystals. They were surrounded as the quartz crystals continued to grow. Scientists analyze inclusions, most of which are microscopic, for clues to a crystal's growth history. Their presence also helps identify a gemstone, and distinguish between natural and synthetic.


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