INVISIBLE SPACE PLACEHOLDER
Arctic Social Science Program

O V E R V I E W

Living in the Arctic

Dr. Noel D. Broadbent

Humans have thrived in the Arctic for at least 15,000 years. In the continuous expanse of land from Scandinavia through Eurasia to Alaska, Canada, and Greenland, native people developed sophisticated cultures and survival technologies. Because of their traditional dependence on hunting and fishing, arctic communities evolved near lakes, rivers, estuaries, and along ice-free coasts. Today, subsistence hunting and fishing remain an important component of daily life and cultural identity, although the major sources of income are oil, mining, and commercial fishing activities.

Human experience in the Arctic reflects both a successful adaptation to changing and often harsh environmental conditions and the effects of modern development on small societies dependent on natural resources. Outside of regional centers like Anchorage and Fairbanks, communities in rural Alaska and other parts of the Arctic tend to be small and isolated. Most families rely on a mixed strategy of subsistence harvesting, wage labor, and commodity production. These communities use traditional knowledge while adapting to the global economy and modern  technology. Change has become a way of life in the North. Economic development in the Arctic has brought new occupations and with that changes in  wealth and income distribution, community and family patterns, and even health and safety.

The National Science Foundation

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is a federal agency which provides funding for research in the sciences and engineering. Awards are based on peer review and scientific merit. The Foundation welcomes proposals from all qualified scientists and engineers and strongly encourages women, minorities, and persons with disabilities to submit proposals to relevant NSF programs. For more information contact the NSF home page at http://www.nsf.gov/ and the internet gopher at stis.nsf.gov. The Foundation does not assume responsibility for individual research findings or  interpretations.

Arctic Research

Arctic research is supported by the NSF Office of Polar Programs (OPP). The OPP Arctic Social Sciences program has been supporting multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research since 1990. Projects encompass the disciplines of anthropology, archaeology, sociology, political science, psychology, linguistics, geography, law, and related fields.  

This web site is intended to provide public information about ongoing  and representative projects in the Arctic Social Sciences.  The included stories are  samples from more than 100 projects supported by the Arctic Social Sciences Program that relate to both modern and ancient themes.

Individual researchers presented here can be contacted directly for more information about their projects. Abstracts of all projects can be obtained from NSF and the Office of Polar Programs. 

For additional information contact the NSF Office of Polar Programs:
http://www.nsf.gov/od/opp/

For information on ethics in reseach in the arctic:
Principles for the Conduct of Research in the Arctic

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In the continuous expanse of land from Scandinavia through Eurasia to Alaska, Canada, and Greenland, native people developed sophisticated cultures and survival technologies..

This web site is intended to provide public information about ongoing  and representative projects in the Arctic Social Sciences

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