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Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History
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Department of Anthropology

Arctic Studies Center

Walter H. Adey is a research scientist and curator in the Department of Botany at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. Dr. Adey earned his PhD in Marine Botany and Pleistocene Geology from the University of Michigan, and he serves as an adjunct professor on the graduate committees of ten different universities and institutions, including Georgetown, George Washington, the University of Maryland, John Hopkins, and the University of Maine. From 2003 to 2013, he served as chief scientist and captain of the research vessel R/V Alca I in the North Atlantic while travelling between Cape Hatteras and Labrador. Dr. Adey will contribute to two of the six case studies for the Arctic Crashes project, including the extirpation of the Atlantic walrus in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the study of Harp Seals and Eskimos in the Eastern Subarctic.

 

Aron L. Crowell is a research anthropologist for the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History and the Director of the Arctic Studies Center’s Alaska Regional Program. His primary areas of expertise include cultural anthropology, archaeology, and oral history, and his influence has been essential in establishing productive collaborations with indigenous arctic people. Dr. Crowell earned his PhD in Anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley and has served as the project director and principal investigator in numerous research endeavors and museum exhibitions. Dr. Crowell will contribute to the Arctic Crashes case study on Harbor Seals and human agents in the Gulf of Alaska.

 

 

William W. Fitzhugh is a curator and Arctic Studies Center Director at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC. Dr. Fitzhugh earned his PhD in Anthropology from Harvard University in 1970 and immediately thereafter joined the Anthropology Department at the Smithsonian Institution. He founded the Arctic Studies Center and created its regional office at the Anchorage Museum in Anchorage, Alaska, and has been an instrumental leader in arctic anthropological and environmental research and has contributed to U.S. cultural and heritage policy in the North. Dr. Fitzhugh has led numerous field research projects and international exhibitions and has authored many books and publications on circumpolar archaeology and anthropology, Vikings, Genghis Khan, and the effects of climate change on Arctic cultures and peoples.  For the Arctic Crashes project, Dr. Fitzhugh will participate in case studies including the extirpation of the Atlantic Walrus in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, a study of climate effects on Harp Seals as relating to Eskimo culture migrations in the Eastern subarctic, and European-Inuit contact and interactions with sea mammals.

 

Igor Krupnik serves as the principal investigator in the Arctic Crashes project. Dr. Krupnik has earned a PhD in Ethnography from the Institute of Ethnography at the Academy of Sciences in Moscow, and he achieved a full doctorate in Ecology, Resource Management and Conservation from the N.N. Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Animal Morphology at the Academy of Sciences in Moscow. Dr. Krupnik is curator of Arctic and Northern Ethnology and the head of the Ethnology Division at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC. His research interests include the culture, ecology, and contact history of Arctic indigenous people, climate change in the Arctic and Bering Sea Regions, and the history of Arctic science. In addition to being the PI for the Arctic Crashes project, Dr. Krupnik will participate in the case study of extirpated Pacific walrus off the southern shore of St. Lawrence Island.

 

Stephen Loring is  a museum anthropologist and arctic archeologist with the Arctic Studies Center, Department of Anthropology, at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History. Dr. Loring received his PhD in Anthropology from the University of Massachusetts/Amherst. He has published extensively on the archaeology and ethnohistory of Inuit and Innu occupations in Labrador, repatriation philosophy, and museum practices and ethics. Dr. Loring is the senior North American representative for the World Archeological Congress. He participates in three of the Arctic Crashes case studies, including the historical fluctuations of the George River caribou herd in Quebec-Labrador, the extirpation of the Atlantic walrus in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and the historical changes in large Baleen Whale distribution in the Northwest Atlantic.

 

Mark Madison has been the Chief Historian at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Conservation Center since 1999 and an adjunct professor at Shepherd University in West Virginia since 2000. He earned a PhD in the history of science from Harvard University and wrote a dissertation titled Green Fields: The Agrarian Conservation Movement in America. Dr. Madison has authored two books and published several major articles on conservation and the government’s role in conservation. For the purpose of synthesis of disciplines in the Arctic Crashes project, Dr. Madison will provide the perspective of science history and government conservation efforts.

 

Nicholas D. Pyenson is the Curator of Fossil Marine Mammals in the Department of Paleobiology at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural history and the Affiliate Curator at the Burke Museum of History and Culture in Seattle, Washington. Dr. Pyenson earned a PhD in Integrative Biology at the University of California, Berkeley and immediately acquired a Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of British Columbia. In recent years, he participated in a number of multimedia productions, research collaborations, museum exhibitions, and publications related to paleontology and biology. For the arctic crashes project, Dr. Pyenson will participate in the case studies on extirpation of the Atlantic walrus in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and historical changes in large Baleen Whale distribution in the Northwest Atlantic.  He will also conduct research on the NMNH collection by cataloging and creating a historical timeline for the Arctic Mammal collections.

 

G. Carleton Ray is a research professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences at the University of Virginia. Prior to that, he served as curator of the New York Zoological Society at the New York Aquarium after earning his PhD in Zoology from Columbia University. Dr. Ray’s most recent work includes editing the 2014 publication Marine Conservation: Science and Policy: 2nd Edition, which is currently in print. He has participated in numerous synergistic collaborations, including several committees of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. For the Arctic Crashes project, Dr. Ray will participate in the case study on assumed extirpated Pacific walruses off the southern shore of St. Lawrence Island.

 

Don E. Wilson is the Curator Emeritus in the Department of Vertebrate Zoology at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC. He formerly held several positions at the NMNH, including senior scientist, Director of Biodiversity Programs, and Chairman of the Department of Vertebrate Zoology. Dr. Wilson earned a PhD in Biology from the University of New Mexico, and he earned his post-doctorate in Ecology from the University of Chicago. For the Arctic Crashes project, Dr. Wilson will conduct research on the NMNH collection by cataloging and creating a historical timeline for the Arctic Mammals collection.

Content Prepared by Joshua Fiacco

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