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Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History
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Department of Anthropology, Arctic Studies Center

The ISC committee in colloboration with the National Museum of the American Indian is proud to host a Northern film festival on Saturday and Sunday October 27 and 28, 2012 in the Rasmuson Theater at the National Museum of the American Indian.

The Schedule is below:

Saturday October 27, 2012

Dinner and a Movie (NMAI Cafeteria open)

6:00PM - 9:00PM

  • Native Time (2010)

    • Sean Morris, Jack Dalton
      No dialogue
      9 minutes

      A traditional Inuit hunter from ages ago scours the barren landscape in search of food. He braves brutal weather, winds and famine, not to mention wet mukluks and sore feet. An expert of this harsh wilderness, he is prepared for absolutely everything . . . except this: A crosswalk in modern day Anchorage, Alaska. Ready to hit the button? A mind-bending and comic examination of culture, perception and time, this zero-dialogue adventure was conceived by and stars world renowned Yup'ik storyteller Cup'luaq (also known as Jack Dalton).

  • The Tundra Book: A Tale of Vukvukai, the Little Rock (2010)

    • Aleksei Vakhrushev, Olga Savelyeva
      Russian and Chukchi with English subtitles
      105 minutes

      72 years have passed as deer herder Vukvukai lives in the depths of Chukotka. He is an old man full of energy and wisdom – The Real Man of Tundra whose life cannot be seen apart from the deer. His people take care of a huge herd – over 14,000 deer. Their life is a non-stop struggle for survival and well-being in the most harsh weather conditions of Chaun-Chukotka. They deeply believe in the strength of tradition and so succeed in their struggle. The ancient culture of Nomadic Chukchi takes care of them, so they preserve and follow it. As far as it is now – their realm remains stable. This is the Truth of Vukvukai.

Sunday October 28, 2012

Film Festival

11:00AM-11:15AM

  • Welcome: Remarks by Stephen Loring

11:20AM-12:40PM

  • History of the Inupiat Project (2011)

    • Rachel Naninaaq Edwardson, Rainey Nasugraq Hopson, David Selvarajah Vadiveloo
      English and Iñupiaq
      72 minutes

      In 1958, as the cold war arms race entered the nuclear age, the United States Atomic Energy Commission planned to detonate eight thermonuclear bombs less than thirty miles from the oldest continually inhabited settlement in North America. This is the dramatic story of a small village of Iñupiaq people who with the help of courageous scientists stopped the most powerful agency of its time, The Atomic Energy Commission, and what happened afterwards.

12:45PM-1:15PM

  • Once in a Lifetime Inuit in Nepal (2012)

    • Mike Jaypoody, Shari Gearheard
      Inuktitut with English subtitles
      35 minutes

      Follow two Inuit hunters as they travel from their Arctic home to the sacred Tsum Valley, deep in the Himalayas of Nepal, next to the Tibetan border. Liemikie Palluq and David Iqaqrialu were born before the time of permanent settlements in the Canadian Arctic. They grew up hunting, and to this day spend most of their time on the land, hunting seals, caribou, and polar bears to feed their families. Until this journey in February 2012, Nepal was only a distant idea from TV or magazines.

      Although Tsum Valley could not be farther away or more exotic—it is a Buddhist “non killing” zone, in sharp contrast to Inuit hunting traditions—it also could not have felt more like home.  Open to visitors only since 2009, the tiny villages of the valley have no running water, minimal electricity, and a strong dependence on the land, animals, and hard work of all family members that brought Liemikie and David right back to their childhood on the Arctic tundra. 

      Through this unique exchange between two cultures, Inuit and Tsumbas found striking similarities to each other – their strong connection and deep knowledge of the land is immediately evident, but so are the challenges they face with a changing climate, changing political economies, access to technology, and a rapidly increasing pace of life. 

      Join Mike Jaypoody, a young Inuit filmmaker, as he takes you with Liemikie and David on a trip far from home, but ultimately to find how closely connected we really are.

1:35PM-1:45PM

  • Native Time (2010)

    • Sean Morris, Jack Dalton
      No dialogue
      9 minutes

      A traditional Inuit hunter from ages ago scours the barren landscape in search of food. He braves brutal weather, winds and famine, not to mention wet mukluks and sore feet. An expert of this harsh wilderness, he is prepared for absolutely everything . . . except this: A crosswalk in modern day Anchorage, Alaska. Ready to hit the button? A mind-bending and comic examination of culture, perception and time, this zero-dialogue adventure was conceived by and stars world renowned Yup'ik storyteller Cup'luaq (also known as Jack Dalton).

1:45PM-2:40PM

  • National Museum of the American Indian: Film and Video Center Program of Selected Shorts from the top of the world

2:45PM-3:30PM

  • Diet of Souls (2004)

    • John Houston
      English and Inuktitut with English subtitles
      48 minutes

      Diet of Souls examines the spiritual relationship between Inuit and the animals on whom they depend for survival. In the first chapter of Genesis, God sets the human race above the animal kingdom, granting us dominion over all other living things on Earth. In the ancient religion of Inuit, however, the birds and beasts have souls, just as we do, and are equally worthy of respect. Despite a century of Christianity, many Inuit still hold fast to this belief. Yet there is a paradox embedded in its very heart: How can animals be both spiritual equals and one’s daily bread? What does it mean to kill and eat creatures who possess souls? The documentary Diet of Souls, from the award-winning partnership of writer-director John Houston and producer Peter d’Entremont, delves deep into this mystery.

3:35PM-4:30PM

  • A Case of Access (2010)

    • Inuvialuit Communications Society, Brett Purdy
      English
      50 minutes

      A Case of Access is a documentary showing our trip to Washington D.C. to see the MacFarlane Collection for the first time. It features members of our project team discussing the objects and their significance today. Produced by the Inuvialuit Communications Society (directed by Brett Purdy), it premiered on the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) in Fall, 2011. On this website, the documentary is tagged with objects in the MacFarlane Collection. This means that when you see an object being handled in the documentary, the record of that object appears in the window next to the video. You can click on the object record to learn more about the object.

4:40PM-5:15PM

  • The Meeting (2010)

    • Ruth Montgomery-Andersen et al.
      English, Danish and Greenlandic, with English and Greenlandic subtitles
      35 minutes

      As an artist and as a woman I strive to create synergy and collective experiences by using the arts and culture to support cultural awareness and tolerance. In my first film I chose to focus on main characters that are women of color, women who have lived long and rich life.

      This is the story of an unusual friendship across the boundaries of culture and language.  In the first half of the last century two women were born, one in Arctic Greenland and one in the Tropical country of Panama. The documentary lets us into the lives of a Greenlandic Inuit woman, Alma Rosing and a multiracial Panamanian woman, Ida Bonnick. Through the window of their meeting we experience joy, sorrow and love for life. It shows us how friendship between two people who are not fluent in each other's languages can still have a depth and wealth. It introduces us to two very different women, who have shown courage and strength throughout their lives. As friends they feel joy with each other's gains and sorrow with each other's losses. It shows us that open-mindedness is not only for the young, but is a mirror of willingness, courage and love of life. This is the story The Meeting.

 

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